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Wednesday, January 31 • 10:40am - 11:00am
FISH PHYSIOLOGY & BEHAVIOR: Gape Width of White Bass Morone Chrysops in Lake McConaughy, Nebraska, with Implications on the Predation on Alewife

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AUTHORS. Garrett Rowles, University of Nebraska Kearney; Keith Koupal, University of Nebraska Kearney, Nebraska Game and Parks CommissionMelissa Wuellner, University of Nebraska Kearney

ABSTRACT. Adult White Bass are piscivorous and therefore available prey is restricted with gape width limitations. Limited information is available about the physical morphometric gape width limitations of this species, particularly related to the consumption of Alewife. Alewives were stocked into Lake McConaughy, Nebraska in 1986 in order to provide a prey resource for recreationally important species such as White Bass. However, anecdotal observations suggest that White Bass are not consuming Alewives. Therefore the objective of this study is to evaluate if White Bass are able to consume Alewife based on gape width limitations. White Bass and Alewife were collected throughout the summer of 2017 and fall using gill nets and near shore electrofishing. Total length (mm), weight (g), and horizontal gape width (to the nearest 0.01 mm) were measured on each White Bass collected and body depth to the nearest 0.01 mm on Alewife. The relationship between White Bass total length and gape width and Alewife total length and body depth were tested using linear regression. A total of 152 White Bass and 200 Alewife were captured and included in assessments. Relationship between total length of White Bass and gape width as well as total length of Alewife and body depth will be shared for Lake McConaughy as well as implications for predator-prey dynamics in this system.

Wednesday January 31, 2018 10:40am - 11:00am CST
103B

Attendees (4)